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callingoutbadfeminism:

vegetableighs:

darebearlee:

josiephone:

josiephone:

Okay guys, I’m going to get serious for a minute. 
If you’re not in Ireland at the moment, you may not know about the situation regarding the laws on abortion. It is completely illegal, even in cases of rape, incest, fatal foetal abnormality, and other such things. 

Women have died in this country because inability to have an abortion put strain on their health. A woman who wasn’t even Irish begged for an abortion because her child was about to die in the womb. The complications arising from her case resulted in her contracting septicaemia, organ failure, and tragically dying. 
In 1992, the X Case took place, involving a 14-year-old girl, knowns only as x, who became pregnant after being raped. Instead of offering help to the girl, who because suicidal, they prevented her from travelling out of the country for an abortion.

Any Irish woman* who needs an abortion has to travel to the UK, which means if you don’t have the money, you’re out of luck. What does the Irish Government have to say about this?

Well, recently the UN confronted the Government about our abortion laws, pointing out that we were breaking Human Rights laws, and that the Government treated Irish women* like vessels.

Joan Burton, the Tánaiste, said that there will be no referendum on abortion in this Government’s lifetime. They’re literally saying that they don’t care enough to rectify Human Rights breaches.

I am NOT a vessel, and neither are you. Make your voice heard. Come to the March for Choice on the 27th of September in Dublin. 

Never give up, never stay quiet.

This has only been up since last night and LADS, the NOTES. Keep spreading the word!

I am Canadian, and I’m sorry to say until I read this I didn’t know anything about what you women were going through.
This is completely disgusting, I can’t even believe what you’re going through.
And I wish I could come out there and march with you.
But I don’t have the money so I can’t.
But I’m going to keep reblogging this, and sharing it.
And I hope all my followers will too.
This is important people, no matter what gender you are or what country you’re in, everyone deserves their basic human rights, and we need to stand together until this becomes a reality.
So please spread the word for these women.

Be lucky you’re in Ireland though, the situation is 10X worse the the “progressive” United States. Just look at places like Texas or Ohio. It’s fucking inhumane here.

Okay Leigh, I don’t think you understand what the words “outright ban” mean.

Ireland has an outright ban on abortion.  That means that under ZERO circumstances can a person who is pregnant obtain an abortion for ANY reason.

The state of Texas does NOT have an outright ban on abortion.  Yes, you have to jump through legal hoops and consent to various invasive procedures, and it is very expensive to do so, but it is technically possible.

- Number 1

tennants-hair:

hipsterinatardis:

l0rdofthepeasants:

twofingerswhiskey:

ifellforloki:

teenage-dirntbag:

casismyfavoritecolor:

sheepies:

casismyfavoritecolor:

sheepies:

(american voice) hairy padder

is that how we sound omfg

yes

(british voice) ‘arry pouhta 

(australian voice) hay putta

(filipino voice) hari paterr

(canadian voice) hairee pawterr

(arab voice) heerry bootar

(malfoy voice) POTTER!

(dumbledore voice) HARRY DIDJA PUT YA NAME IN DA GOBLET OF FIYAH

kaniethiio:

"sexuality is a choice"

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"women wouldn’t get raped if they didn’t wear revealing clothes"

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"there are only two genders"

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"i’m not trying to be sexist/racist, but.."

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"a/bi/pansexuality isn’t real"

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"gay people shouldn’t have children"

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"i don’t want to be friends with a gay person, they could hit on me"

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"you can’t identify with the gender you want to be, only the one you were born with"

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(Source: eilizabeth)

Why This Woman Is Facing Decades In Prison For Going To The Hospital [TW: Sexism, Misogyny, Criminalization of Women & Pregnant Women]

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A 33-year-old woman from Indiana faces decades in prison after she sought medical attention at a hospital as she was bleeding from a premature delivery. The case is just the latest example illustrating the real-world consequences of the harsh state laws that essentially criminalize pregnancy.

According to the charges being filed against her, Purvi Patel attempted to end her pregnancy last year by taking pills that she bought online from Hong Kong. The pills didn’t work, and Patel eventually delivered a premature baby at home. When she went to an emergency room to seek treatment after giving birth, the staff asked why she didn’t have an infant with her. She said her baby appeared to be dead, and she had wrapped it in a bag and placed it in a dumpster.

Now, Patel is being charged with both neglect and feticide, allegations that actually conflict with each other. She was initially charged with “neglect of a dependent” after prosecutors learned she left her baby in in a dumpster, a charge that won’t apply if the baby was already dead. But she’s now also being charged with “fetal murder of an unborn child” — a charge that an Indiana judge allowed to stand this week — for taking drugs that could have illegally ended her pregnancy.

As the Daily Beast’s Sally Kohn points out, the logic doesn’t exactly hold up. “The State of Indiana intends to convict and incarcerate Purvi Patel one way or another, whether the fetus she delivered was alive or not — never mind the fact that the facts necessary for filing the one charge (that the fetus have been alive) entirely contradict the facts necessary for filing the other (that the fetus have been dead) and vice versa,” Kohn writes.

On top of that, reproductive rights advocates and legal experts point out that Indiana’s “feticide” law was never intended to be applied to pregnant women themselves. It was originally written as a way to crack down on illegal abortion providers. Critics say Patel fits into a disturbing trend; similar “fetal homicide” laws are in place in at least 38 states, and they’re increasingly used to punish women who end up having miscarriages or stillbirths.

“Once again targeting a woman of color, prosecutors in Indiana are using this very sad situation to establish that intentional abortions as well as unintentional pregnancy losses should be punished as crimes,” Lynn Paltrow, the executive director of National Advocates for Pregnant Women, which tracks these cases closely, said in a recent statement about Patel’s case. “In the U.S., as a matter of constitutional law and human decency, no woman should be arrested for the outcome of her pregnancy.”

Patel is the second woman to be prosecuted under Indiana’s feticide law. The state also pressed charges against Bei Bei Shuai, a Chinese immigrant who attempted suicide while pregnant and ended up delivering a baby that didn’t survive. Shaui was imprisoned for more than a year before a plea deal was reached in April, and her case sparked international outrage. More than 100,000 people signed onto a petition demanding Shuai’s release and pointing out that “it is wrong to have a set of separate and unequal laws for pregnant women.”

The laws that allow states to arrest pregnant women for allegedly harming their fetuses actually end up undermining public health. Major medical groups like the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologistsoppose “feticide” laws because they ultimately deter women from seeking the medical attention they need.

Harsh restrictions on abortion, as well as unreasonably broad definitionsof “fetal homicide,” have created a society in which all pregnant women are transformed into potential suspects in the eyes of the law. And since miscarriage and abortion are relatively common pregnancy experiences — and research has proven that women are going to end their pregnancies whether or not it’s legal — that means we’re also approaching a society in which desperate women may be too terrified to ask for health treatment. For instance, if Patel had known that she was at risk for being charged with fetal homicide, would she have thought twice about going to the emergency room? Would she have joined the millions of women around the world who die from botched abortions and risky childbirth?

“We cannot afford to deter a woman from seeking reproductive health care,” the Indiana Religious Coalition for Reproductive Justice pointed out in a statement released this week. “Those of us who are Christian know that when Jesus responded to the hemorrhaging woman there was no place for aggressive interrogation and punishment. It was all for healing.”

Source: Tara Culp-Ressler for ThinkProgress

lexlifts:

thornsandwillows:

If you take a young man and woman and they both tell a stranger that they work in the same restaurant, it’s very likely that they will assume that the woman is the waitress, and the young man a cook.

But I thought a woman’s place was in the kitchen? Not when she’s being paid for it. I can’t believe it took me this long to realize the implication of this. A woman’s place is one of servitude.

this fucking hit me like a fucking train 

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